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The Future of Smart Home Tech: Consumers Want Smart Controls on Their Old Appliances

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why axis chart future of smart homes

New data suggests the number-one thing consumers want from future smart home technology is to integrate older appliances into their smart home network. And they don’t want to pay extra for smart devices.

According to data gathered by PCMag via a Google Survey of 2,075 US consumers, 30 percent don’t want brand-new smart tech; they want to connect the appliances they already own. Instead of having to buy pricey new appliances with smart features, consumers want to be able to use voice control technology with their trusty 15-year-old coffeemaker or washer and dryer.

The survey also found that tech to assist with mundane household chores—folding laundry and doing yard work—were next on the list, at 17 percent each, with smart bed technology at 15 percent and smart closets at 12 percent.

why axis chart paying for smart home

These figures come alongside data showing that consumers overwhelmingly don’t want to have to pay extra for smart home devices, with 57 percent of responders saying they’re not willing to pay more.

Advances over the past few years have made smart home technology more integrated, prompting discussion on where it should go next. It turns out that most consumers simply want practical technology that won’t cost them an arm and a leg.

Integration of older-gen appliances into a smart home network can be managed with products such as smart plugs, many of which are super affordable at under $30. But other items on the wishlist could be out of reach for the everyday consumer.

For example, Laundroid, an automated machine that washes, dries, and folds your clothes for you is so far available only in Japan and costs a cool $16,000.

Automated lawn mowers are nowhere near that expensive, but they’ll cost you $1,000 to $3,000, depending on how many bells and whistles you want in your lawn-Roomba.

Smart beds are another fast-developing area of tech: They come equipped with biometric sensors that let you control the temperature and firmness of the mattress and track your sleep metrics. But the model we tested cost $3,896.62—and that price could cost you a few nights’ sleep.

[“source=pcmag”]

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